Glaucoma Treatment in Hyderabad

Best Hospital for Glaucoma Treatment
in Hyderabad

Don't let glaucoma steal your sight.
Continental Hospitals offers advanced glaucoma treatments, employing surgical and non-surgical interventions to manage the condition effectively and improve patients' quality of life.
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Best Doctors For Glaucoma Treatment In Hyderabad

At Continental Hospitals in Hyderabad, patients can access top-notch care for glaucoma from a team of highly skilled specialists renowned for their expertise in managing this condition. Led by experienced ophthalmologists, the hospital has a cadre of dedicated professionals adept at employing cutting-edge diagnostic techniques.

Glaucoma Surgery Cost in Hyderabad

The cost of glaucoma surgery in Hyderabad can vary depending on several factors, including the type of procedure required, the hospital or clinic chosen, and the individual patient's specific needs.

24/7 Services

Continental Hospitals offers round-the-clock medical services, providing constant care and support to meet your healthcare needs anytime, day or night.
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What is Glaucoma?

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Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, which is crucial for good vision. This damage is often caused by abnormally high pressure in the eye, known as intraocular pressure (IOP). Glaucoma can lead to vision loss and blindness if left untreated.

Causes of Glaucoma

The exact cause of glaucoma is not always clear, but several factors can contribute to its development:

Increased Intraocular Pressure (IOP): The most significant risk factor for glaucoma is elevated intraocular pressure. When the fluid (aqueous humor) inside the eye does not drain properly, it can lead to increased pressure, damaging the optic nerve over time.

Age: Glaucoma becomes more common as people age. While it can occur at any age, the risk increases significantly after the age of 40 and continues to rise with age.

Family History: A family history of glaucoma increases the risk of developing the condition. There may be a genetic predisposition to the disease.

Ethnicity: Some ethnic groups, such as African Americans, are at higher risk of certain types of glaucoma, such as primary open-angle glaucoma. Additionally, people of Asian descent may have an increased risk of angle-closure glaucoma.

Medical Conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease, can increase the risk of glaucoma.

Eye Trauma or Injury: Trauma to the eye or previous eye surgery can sometimes lead to glaucoma.

Prolonged Use of Corticosteroids: Long-term use of corticosteroid medications, whether in the form of eye drops, pills, or inhalers, can increase the risk of developing glaucoma.

Other Eye Conditions: Some eye conditions, such as uveitis or retinal detachment, can increase the risk of glaucoma.

Symptoms of Glaucoma

  • Gradual loss of peripheral vision
  • Blurred vision
  • Difficulty seeing in low light conditions
  • Halos around lights
  • Severe eye pain
  • Headaches
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Types of Glaucoma

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There are several types of glaucoma, including:

Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma, characterized by a gradual increase in intraocular pressure due to impaired drainage of aqueous humor from the eye's trabecular meshwork. This leads to progressive damage to the optic nerve, often resulting in peripheral vision loss that can advance to tunnel vision or blindness if left untreated.

Symptoms:

  • Often asymptomatic in the early stages
  • Gradual loss of peripheral vision
  • Tunnel vision in advanced stages
  • Blurred vision
  • Halos around lights
  • Eye pain or headache
  • Difficulty adjusting to low light conditions

Diagnosis and Treatment: Diagnosis of POAG involves a comprehensive eye examination, including measurement of intraocular pressure, examination of the optic nerve, assessment of visual field, and sometimes imaging tests like optical coherence tomography (OCT). Treatment typically aims to lower intraocular pressure to prevent further damage to the optic nerve. This can be achieved through various methods, including eye drops to reduce fluid production or increase drainage, laser therapy to improve drainage, or surgery to create a new drainage pathway. Regular monitoring and adherence to treatment regimens are crucial to managing POAG and preserving vision. Early detection and intervention are key to preventing irreversible vision loss associated with this condition.

Angle-Closure Glaucoma (ACG) is a type of glaucoma characterized by a sudden or rapidly progressing increase in intraocular pressure due to blockage of the eye's drainage angle, leading to optic nerve damage. Unlike open-angle glaucoma, where the drainage angle remains open but ineffective, in ACG, the angle becomes closed or narrowed, preventing the outflow of aqueous humor from the eye, resulting in a rapid increase in pressure.

Symptoms:

  • Sudden onset of severe eye pain
  • Headache
  • Blurred or cloudy vision
  • Halos around lights
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Redness in the eye
  • Decreased or tunnel vision

Diagnosis and Treatment: Diagnosis of ACG involves a thorough eye examination, including measurement of intraocular pressure, assessment of the drainage angle using techniques like gonioscopy, examination of the optic nerve, and visual field testing. Immediate treatment is necessary to relieve intraocular pressure and prevent vision loss. This often includes medications to lower intraocular pressure, such as oral or topical medications to reduce fluid production or promote drainage. In severe cases or when medications are insufficient, laser therapy, such as laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI), may be performed to create a hole in the iris, allowing fluid to flow freely and relieve pressure. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to improve drainage and prevent further episodes of angle closure. Prompt recognition and treatment of ACG are essential to prevent permanent vision loss and manage symptoms effectively.

Normal-Tension Glaucoma (NTG), also known as low-tension or normal-pressure glaucoma, is a form of glaucoma where optic nerve damage and vision loss occur despite intraocular pressure (IOP) being within the normal range (typically 12-22 mmHg). The exact cause of NTG is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve factors such as impaired blood flow to the optic nerve, genetic predisposition, and structural abnormalities of the optic nerve.

Symptoms:

  • Gradual loss of peripheral vision
  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Difficulty seeing in low light conditions
  • Frequent changes in glasses prescription
  • Difficulty adjusting to the dark
  • Headache or eye pain

Diagnosis and Treatment: Diagnosing NTG involves a comprehensive eye examination, including measurement of intraocular pressure, assessment of the optic nerve structure and function, visual field testing, and evaluation of blood flow to the optic nerve. Treatment aims to slow the progression of the disease and prevent further vision loss. This often involves the use of topical eye drops to lower intraocular pressure, similar to the treatment approach for other types of glaucoma. Additionally, lifestyle modifications such as regular exercise, maintaining a healthy diet, and avoiding smoking can help manage NTG. Close monitoring and adherence to treatment regimens are crucial to preserving vision and preventing irreversible damage to the optic nerve.

Secondary glaucoma refers to a type of glaucoma that develops as a result of another underlying eye condition or medical problem. Unlike primary glaucoma, where the cause is often related to an issue with the eye's drainage system, secondary glaucoma can occur due to factors such as eye trauma, eye surgery, inflammation, tumor, certain medications, or systemic diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure. The underlying cause of secondary glaucoma must be identified and treated to manage intraocular pressure effectively and prevent further damage to the optic nerve.

Symptoms:

  • Elevated intraocular pressure
  • Gradual loss of peripheral vision
  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Halos around lights
  • Eye pain or headache
  • Redness in the eye
  • Nausea and vomiting

Diagnosis and Treatment: Diagnosis of secondary glaucoma involves a thorough examination of the eye to identify the underlying cause, including measurement of intraocular pressure, assessment of the optic nerve, visual field testing, and sometimes imaging tests like ultrasound or optical coherence tomography (OCT). Treatment depends on the underlying cause but often includes medications to lower intraocular pressure, laser therapy to improve drainage, or surgery to create a new drainage pathway or remove the underlying cause. Management of secondary glaucoma requires a multidisciplinary approach involving ophthalmologists and other healthcare providers to address the underlying condition and prevent further vision loss. Regular monitoring and adherence to treatment regimens are essential for preserving vision and maintaining eye health.

Congenital glaucoma is a rare but serious eye condition present at birth or shortly thereafter, resulting from improper development of the eye's drainage system during gestation. This leads to increased intraocular pressure, which can cause damage to the optic nerve and subsequent vision loss if left untreated. Congenital glaucoma typically manifests in infants or young children and requires early detection and intervention to prevent permanent vision impairment.

Symptoms:

  • Enlarged or cloudy cornea
  • Excessive tearing
  • Light sensitivity
  • Redness in the eye
  • Blinking or squeezing of the eyes
  • Elevated intraocular pressure
  • Poor vision or inability to focus on objects

Diagnosis and Treatment: Diagnosing congenital glaucoma involves a comprehensive eye examination, including measurement of intraocular pressure, assessment of the optic nerve, examination of the cornea, and evaluation of visual function. Treatment aims to lower intraocular pressure and preserve vision, often through surgical intervention. The most common surgical procedure for congenital glaucoma is goniotomy or trabeculotomy, which involves creating a new drainage pathway to allow aqueous humor to flow out of the eye more efficiently. In some cases, additional surgeries or lifelong management may be necessary to control intraocular pressure and prevent further vision loss. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are crucial for optimizing outcomes and minimizing the risk of permanent vision impairment in children with congenital glaucoma.

What are the types of Glaucoma Treatment?

Glaucoma treatment typically falls into several categories, depending on the severity and type of glaucoma. Here are some common types:

Medication: Eye drops or oral medications can be prescribed to either reduce the production of fluid in the eye (aqueous humor) or to increase its outflow. These medications help in controlling intraocular pressure (IOP), a key factor in glaucoma management.

Laser Therapy: Several types of laser therapy can be used in glaucoma treatment:

Laser trabeculoplasty: This procedure helps improve the outflow of fluid from the eye by targeting the trabecular meshwork.

Laser peripheral iridotomy: It's primarily used for narrow-angle or angle-closure glaucoma to create a small hole in the iris, allowing fluid to flow more freely within the eye.

Cyclophotocoagulation: This laser treatment targets the ciliary body to reduce the production of aqueous humor.

Surgery: When medication and laser therapy are not effective in controlling glaucoma, surgery may be necessary. Surgical options include:

Trabeculectomy: A surgical procedure that creates a new drainage channel for the fluid to leave the eye, reducing intraocular pressure.

Glaucoma drainage implants (aqueous shunts): Devices implanted in the eye to facilitate the drainage of aqueous humor.

Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS): These procedures are less invasive compared to traditional glaucoma surgeries and include techniques like trabecular micro-bypass stents or canaloplasty.

Combination Therapy: In some cases, a combination of medications, laser therapy, and surgery may be necessary to effectively manage glaucoma.

Glaucoma Surgery Cost in Hyderabad

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The cost of glaucoma surgery in Hyderabad can vary depending on the procedure type and other factors. Generally, expect a range of ₹50,000 to ₹80,000 for procedures like laser surgery or trabeculectomy. Minimally invasive surgery can cost upwards of ₹1,00,000. Consulting an ophthalmologist and getting a quote for your specific case is recommended for the most accurate estimate.
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Best Doctors For Glaucoma Treatment In Hyderabad

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Continental Hospitals in Hyderabad has a team of highly skilled ophthalmologists specializing in glaucoma treatment. With a reputation for excellence in eye care, the hospital's glaucoma specialists are renowned for their expertise in diagnosing and managing various forms of the condition.

Dr Naveen Yalamanchali

Consultant Ophthalmologist

Dr V Sahiti Priya

Consultant Ophthalmologist

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is glaucoma?
Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, usually due to increased pressure within the eye. It can lead to vision loss and blindness if not treated.
What causes glaucoma?
The exact cause of glaucoma isn't always clear, but it's often associated with increased pressure in the eye. This can result from fluid buildup or inadequate drainage within the eye.
Are there different types of glaucoma?
Yes, there are several types of glaucoma. The most common types are open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma. Other types include normal-tension glaucoma and congenital glaucoma.
What are the symptoms of glaucoma?
In the early stages, glaucoma often has no symptoms. As it progresses, it can cause peripheral vision loss, tunnel vision, blurred vision, halos around lights, and severe eye pain or headache.
Who is at risk for glaucoma?
Anyone can develop glaucoma, but certain factors can increase the risk, including age, family history of glaucoma, certain medical conditions (like diabetes), previous eye injuries, and prolonged use of corticosteroid medications.
How is glaucoma diagnosed?
Glaucoma is typically diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam, which may include measuring eye pressure, examining the optic nerve, assessing peripheral vision, and evaluating the drainage angle of the eye.
Can glaucoma be treated?
Yes, although there is no cure for glaucoma, it can be managed effectively to slow down or prevent further vision loss. Treatment options may include prescription eye drops, oral medications, laser therapy, or surgery to improve drainage.
How often should I get my eyes checked for glaucoma?
It's recommended that adults have a comprehensive eye exam every 1 to 2 years, especially if they are over 40 years old or have risk factors for glaucoma.