Cataract Treatment in Hyderabad

Best Hospital for Cataract Treatment
in Hyderabad

Don't let cataracts cloud your vision.
At Continental Hospitals in Hyderabad, cataract treatment combines advanced surgical techniques with personalized care for optimal vision restoration and patient comfort.
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Best Cataract surgery Doctors in Hyderabad

Continental Hospitals in Hyderabad has a team of highly skilled ophthalmologists renowned for their expertise in cataract surgery.

Cataract Surgery Cost In Hyderabad

The cost of cataract surgery in Hyderabad can vary depending on several factors. This covers pre-operative tests, surgery itself, post-surgical medication and consultations, and the type of intraocular lens implanted.

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Continental Hospitals offers round-the-clock medical services, providing constant care and support to meet your healthcare needs anytime, day or night.
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What is Cataract?

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A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. It usually develops slowly and eventually interferes with clear vision. Cataracts are most commonly related to aging, but they can also occur due to injury, certain medications, or medical conditions such as diabetes.

Causes of Cataract

Age: Aging is the most common cause of cataracts. As you get older, the proteins in your eye's lens can clump together, forming a cataract.

Ultraviolet Radiation: Overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight and other sources can increase the risk of developing cataracts.

Smoking: Smoking cigarettes has been linked to an increased risk of cataract development.

Diabetes: People with diabetes are at higher risk of developing cataracts, likely due to the metabolic changes and oxidative stress associated with the condition.

Trauma: Eye injuries, especially those that damage the lens, can lead to the development of cataracts.

Medications: Long-term use of certain medications, such as corticosteroids, can increase the risk of cataracts.

Genetics: Some people may be genetically predisposed to cataracts, meaning they are more likely to develop them if other family members have had them.

Other Eye Conditions: Certain eye conditions, such as uveitis or retinitis pigmentosa, can increase the risk of developing cataracts.

Environmental Factors: Prolonged exposure to certain environmental factors like pollution or radiation can contribute to cataract formation.

Nutritional Deficiencies: A diet lacking in antioxidants and certain vitamins, particularly vitamin C and vitamin E, may increase the risk of cataracts.

Symptoms of Cataract

  • Visible gap or split in the upper lip
  • Notched appearance in the lip
  • Possible asymmetry in the nostrils or nose
  • Difficulty with feeding, especially in infants
  • Speech difficulties as the child grows older
If you experience any Cataract symptoms, Call Immediately.
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Types of Cataract

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Cataracts are categorized based on their location within the eye and their cause. Here are the primary types:

Age-related cataracts are a common condition characterized by the clouding of the lens in the eye, typically occurring as a result of aging. Over time, proteins in the lens clump together, leading to reduced transparency and blurred vision. This can interfere with daily activities such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. Age-related cataracts often develop gradually and may affect one or both eyes.

Symptoms include:

  • Blurry or cloudy vision
  • Difficulty seeing at night
  • Sensitivity to glare from lights
  • Seeing "halos" around lights
  • Colors appearing faded or yellowed
  • Double vision in one eye

Diagnosis of age-related cataracts involves a comprehensive eye examination by an ophthalmologist, which may include a visual acuity test, a dilated eye exam, and other specialized tests to assess the extent of the cataract and its impact on vision. Treatment typically involves surgery to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial lens, restoring clear vision. This surgery, known as cataract surgery, is one of the most commonly performed and highly successful procedures, often resulting in significant improvement in vision and quality of life for individuals with age-related cataracts.

Congenital cataracts are a type of cataract that occurs in infants or children, either at birth or shortly after. They can develop due to genetic factors or be associated with maternal infections during pregnancy, such as rubella, or other maternal health issues. These cataracts can affect one or both eyes and may vary in severity, from small areas of cloudiness to complete opacity of the lens.

Symptoms include:

  • Cloudy or white pupil in the affected eye(s)
  • Poor vision or difficulty focusing
  • Rapid eye movements (nystagmus)
  • Sensitivity to light (photophobia)

Diagnosis of congenital cataracts typically involves a thorough eye examination by a pediatric ophthalmologist, often performed shortly after birth or during infancy. Specialized tests such as visual evoked potentials (VEP) or electroretinography (ERG) may be used to assess visual function. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the cataract, followed by the implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL) if necessary to restore vision. Prompt diagnosis and intervention are crucial to prevent potential long-term visual impairment and developmental delays in affected children.

Secondary cataracts, also known as posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or after-cataracts, can develop as a complication following cataract surgery. Despite successful removal of the original cataract, some residual lens cells may remain behind and proliferate on the back surface of the lens capsule, causing it to become cloudy. This can lead to blurred vision similar to that experienced before cataract surgery.

Symptoms include:

  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Glare or halos around lights
  • Difficulty seeing in dim or bright light conditions

Diagnosis of secondary cataracts typically involves a comprehensive eye examination by an ophthalmologist, often including visual acuity testing, slit-lamp examination, and assessment of visual symptoms. Treatment for secondary cataracts usually involves a quick and painless outpatient procedure called YAG laser capsulotomy. During this procedure, a laser is used to create an opening in the cloudy capsule, allowing light to pass through and restoring clear vision. YAG laser capsulotomy is highly effective and typically results in an immediate improvement in visual acuity with minimal risk of complications.

Traumatic cataracts are a type of cataract that develops as a result of physical injury to the eye. This injury can be caused by blunt trauma, such as a blow to the eye, or penetrating trauma, such as an object piercing the eye. The trauma damages the lens, leading to cloudiness and opacity, which can impair vision.

Symptoms include:

  • Blurred or cloudy vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Double vision
  • Seeing "floaters" or spots in vision
  • Eye pain or discomfort

Diagnosis of traumatic cataracts involves a thorough eye examination by an ophthalmologist, often including visual acuity testing, slit-lamp examination, and assessment of the extent of the cataract and any associated eye injuries. Treatment depends on the severity of the cataract and any accompanying eye damage. In some cases, if the cataract is not causing significant vision loss, observation and monitoring may be recommended. However, if the cataract is affecting vision, surgery to remove the cataract and, if necessary, repair any other eye injuries may be necessary to restore clear vision and prevent complications.

Radiation cataracts are a type of cataract that develops as a result of prolonged exposure to certain types of radiation. This radiation can come from various sources, including UV radiation from the sun, ionizing radiation from X-rays or radiation therapy used to treat cancer, or occupational exposure to radiation. The radiation damages the lens of the eye, leading to cloudiness and opacity, which can impair vision.

Symptoms include:

  • Blurred or cloudy vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Difficulty seeing in dim or bright light conditions
  • Changes in color perception
  • Halo effects around lights

Diagnosis of radiation cataracts involves a comprehensive eye examination by an ophthalmologist, often including visual acuity testing, slit-lamp examination, and assessment of the extent of the cataract and any associated eye damage. Treatment for radiation cataracts focuses on managing symptoms and preventing progression. This may include prescription glasses or contact lenses to improve visual acuity, as well as lifestyle modifications such as wearing sunglasses with UV protection to reduce further UV exposure. In severe cases where vision is significantly impaired, cataract surgery may be necessary to remove the cloudy lens and restore clear vision.

What are the Types of Cataract Surgery?

Cataract surgery is a common procedure to remove a clouded lens (cataract) from the eye and replace it with an artificial lens to restore clear vision. There are primarily two types of cataract surgery:

Phacoemulsification (Phaco): This is the most common type of cataract surgery. In phacoemulsification, a small incision is made in the cornea, and a probe is inserted into the eye. The probe emits ultrasound waves to break up the cloudy lens into small pieces, which are then suctioned out of the eye. After the cataract is removed, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is inserted into the same capsular bag that held the natural lens. Phacoemulsification is a minimally invasive procedure that typically requires only topical anesthesia and often results in faster recovery times.

Extracapsular Cataract Surgery (ECCE): In extracapsular cataract surgery, a larger incision is made in the cornea, and the cloudy core of the lens is removed in one piece. The outer shell of the lens (capsule) is left intact to support the new intraocular lens (IOL). This procedure is typically used when phacoemulsification is not feasible due to factors such as advanced cataracts or other eye conditions. Extracapsular surgery may require stitches to close the larger incision and often has a longer recovery time compared to phacoemulsification.

Cataract Surgery Cost In Hyderabad

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The cost of cataract surgery in Hyderabad can vary depending on several factor. This covers pre-operative tests, surgeon fees, the intraocular lens implant, and post-surgical medications. The biggest cost factor is the type of lens implant you choose, with basic monofocal lenses being the most affordable and advanced multifocal lenses costing more.
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Best Cataract surgery Doctors in Hyderabad

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Continental Hospitals in Hyderabad has a roster of highly skilled and experienced ophthalmologists renowned for their expertise in cataract surgery.

Dr Naveen Yalamanchali

Consultant Ophthalmologist

Dr V Sahiti Priya

Consultant Ophthalmologist

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is a cataract?
A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye which leads to a decrease in vision. It is a common condition associated with aging but can also occur due to injury, medication, or other medical conditions.
What is cataract surgery?
Cataract surgery is a procedure to remove the cloudy lens from the eye and replace it with an artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). This surgery is typically done on an outpatient basis and is considered one of the safest and most effective surgical procedures.
How do I know if I need cataract surgery?
If cataracts are significantly affecting your vision and quality of life, your eye doctor may recommend cataract surgery. Common symptoms include blurred vision, sensitivity to light, difficulty seeing at night, and seeing halos around lights.
What happens during cataract surgery?
During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed and replaced with an artificial lens implant. The procedure is usually performed under local anesthesia, and most patients are awake during the surgery. The surgeon makes a small incision in the eye, uses ultrasound energy to break up the cloudy lens (phacoemulsification), and then inserts the IOL.
How long does cataract surgery take?
Cataract surgery typically takes about 15 to 30 minutes per eye. However, you should plan to spend a few hours at the surgical facility for pre-operative preparation and post-operative observation.
What is recovery like after cataract surgery?
Most people experience improved vision within a few days after surgery, but full recovery may take several weeks. You may need to use prescription eye drops and wear a protective shield over your eye at night. Avoid strenuous activities and heavy lifting during the initial recovery period.
What are the potential risks and complications of cataract surgery?
While cataract surgery is considered safe, like any surgery, there are risks involved, including infection, bleeding, inflammation, retinal detachment, and vision loss. However, these complications are rare, and your surgeon will take precautions to minimize risks.
Will I still need glasses after cataract surgery?
Many people experience a significant improvement in their vision after cataract surgery and may not need glasses for everyday activities. However, you may still need glasses for reading or for tasks that require sharp vision at near or intermediate distances.