Acid Reflux Treatment in Hyderabad

Best Hospital for Acid Reflux Treatment
in Hyderabad

Feeling the burn of acid reflux?
Continental Hospitals provides comprehensive treatment for acid reflux, including medication management and lifestyle modifications tailored to each patient's needs.
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Acid Reflux Specialist in Hyderabad

If you're seeking specialized care for acid reflux in Hyderabad, Continental Hospitals offers comprehensive services dedicated to managing and treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Acid Reflux Treatment Cost in Hyderabad

In Hyderabad, the cost of acid reflux treatment can vary depending on the specific diagnostic tests, medications, and procedures recommended by healthcare providers. Typically, initial consultations and diagnostic tests such as endoscopies or pH monitoring may incur separate charges.

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What is Acid Reflux?

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Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), occurs when stomach acid or bile flows back into the esophagus, causing irritation and inflammation. This condition typically manifests as a burning sensation in the chest, known as heartburn, along with regurgitation of sour liquid or food.

Causes of Acid Reflux

Several factors can contribute to this condition:

Hiatal Hernia: A hiatal hernia can weaken the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), which normally prevents acid from backing up into the esophagus.

Weak Lower Esophageal Sphincter (LES): The LES may relax or weaken, allowing stomach acid to reflux into the esophagus.

Dietary Factors: Certain foods and beverages can trigger or worsen acid reflux, including spicy foods, citrus fruits, tomatoes, chocolate, caffeine, and alcohol.

Obesity: Excess weight, especially around the abdomen, can put pressure on the stomach and LES, increasing the risk of acid reflux.

Smoking: Smoking weakens the LES and increases acid production in the stomach, making acid reflux more likely.

Pregnancy: Hormonal changes and increased pressure on the abdomen during pregnancy can lead to acid reflux.

Certain Medications: Some medications, such as NSAIDs (like ibuprofen), muscle relaxants, and certain blood pressure medications, can worsen acid reflux symptoms.

Delayed Stomach Emptying (Gastroparesis): When the stomach takes longer to empty, there is a greater chance of acid reflux.

Eating Habits: Eating large meals or lying down right after a meal can trigger acid reflux.

Stress: While not a direct cause, stress can exacerbate acid reflux symptoms by increasing stomach acid production or causing muscle tension.

Symptoms of Acid Reflux

  • Heartburn
  • Regurgitation of food or sour liquid
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Coughing or wheezing
  • Hoarseness or sore throat
If you experience any Acid Reflux symptoms, Call Immediately.
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Types of Acid Reflux

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Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a chronic digestive disorder where stomach acid or bile flows back (refluxes) into the esophagus, causing irritation and inflammation of its lining. This condition occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter, a muscular ring at the junction of the esophagus and stomach, relaxes inappropriately or weakens, allowing stomach contents to regurgitate upwards.

Symptoms of GERD include:

  • Heartburn, a burning sensation in the chest
  • Regurgitation of food or sour liquid
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Coughing and wheezing
  • Hoarseness or sore throat
  • Belching

Diagnosis of GERD typically involves a combination of patient history, symptom assessment, and diagnostic tests such as upper endoscopy, pH monitoring, and imaging studies like barium swallow. Treatment focuses on symptom management and preventing complications, often beginning with lifestyle changes such as diet modification, weight loss, and avoiding trigger foods. Medications like proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2-receptor antagonists may be prescribed to reduce stomach acid production and alleviate symptoms. In severe cases or when medications are ineffective, surgical interventions such as fundoplication may be considered to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter and prevent reflux.

Laryngopharyngeal Reflux (LPR) is a condition where stomach acid or digestive enzymes reflux into the larynx (voice box) and pharynx (throat), rather than the esophagus. Unlike GERD, LPR often presents with atypical symptoms and may be characterized by throat irritation and inflammation due to the acidic contents reaching the upper airway.

Symptoms of LPR include:

  • Hoarseness or voice changes
  • Chronic cough
  • Throat clearing
  • Globus sensation (feeling of a lump in the throat)
  • Sore throat
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Postnasal drip

Diagnosis of LPR involves a thorough patient history and physical examination, focusing on symptoms related to the throat and voice box. Diagnostic tests such as laryngoscopy (examining the throat with a flexible scope), pH monitoring (measuring acid levels in the throat), and sometimes imaging studies like barium swallow may be conducted to assess the extent of reflux and its impact on the upper airway. Treatment of LPR aims to reduce acid reflux and alleviate symptoms through lifestyle modifications such as dietary changes (avoiding acidic or spicy foods, caffeine, and alcohol), weight management, and raising the head of the bed during sleep. Medications like proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2-receptor antagonists may be prescribed to reduce stomach acid production. In some cases, behavioral therapies to improve swallowing techniques or surgical interventions to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter may be considered if conservative measures are ineffective.

Non-Erosive Reflux Disease (NERD) refers to a subset of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) where individuals experience typical GERD symptoms without evidence of esophageal mucosal damage upon endoscopic examination. Despite the absence of visible tissue damage, NERD shares similar underlying mechanisms with GERD, involving inappropriate relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus.

Symptoms of NERD include:

  • Heartburn, a burning sensation in the chest
  • Regurgitation of acid or food
  • Sour taste in the mouth
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)

Diagnosis of NERD relies heavily on patient history and symptom assessment, as well as ruling out other potential causes of similar symptoms. While endoscopy may not reveal visible damage to the esophagus, pH monitoring and impedance testing can confirm episodes of acid reflux and assess the severity and frequency of reflux events. Treatment of NERD typically begins with lifestyle modifications such as dietary changes, weight management, and avoidance of trigger foods. Medications like proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which reduce stomach acid production, are commonly prescribed to alleviate symptoms and promote healing of any underlying esophageal inflammation. For refractory cases, combination therapy with PPIs and prokinetic agents or surgical interventions to reinforce the lower esophageal sphincter may be considered.

What are the treatment options for Acid Reflux?

Treatment options for acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), typically aim to reduce symptoms and prevent complications

Lifestyle changes are often the first line of defense. These include avoiding trigger foods like spicy and acidic foods, maintaining a healthy weight, not lying down immediately after eating, and raising the head of the bed. These measures can help reduce the frequency and severity of reflux episodes by minimizing the amount of stomach acid that backs up into the esophagus.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications can provide relief for mild to moderate symptoms. Antacids, such as Tums or Rolaids, neutralize stomach acid and can provide quick but short-term relief. H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) like ranitidine (Zantac) and famotidine (Pepcid) reduce the production of stomach acid and can provide longer-lasting relief compared to antacids. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and esomeprazole (Nexium) are also commonly used to reduce stomach acid production and promote healing of the esophagus in more severe cases.

For persistent or severe symptoms that do not respond well to medications or lifestyle changes, surgical options may be considered. Fundoplication is a surgical procedure where the upper part of the stomach is wrapped around the lower esophagus to strengthen the sphincter and prevent acid reflux. It is usually considered when medications and lifestyle changes fail to provide adequate relief or when there are complications such as Barrett's esophagus or esophageal strictures.

Acid Reflux Treatment Cost in Hyderabad

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In Hyderabad, the cost of acid reflux treatment can vary depending on factors such as the severity of the condition, the specific treatment plan recommended by the gastroenterologist, and the hospital or clinic chosen for the procedure. Typically, diagnostic tests like endoscopy or pH monitoring may be required to assess the extent of the reflux, followed by medications or lifestyle adjustments.
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Acid Reflux Specialist in Hyderabad

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Continental Hospitals in Hyderabad has a team of specialized professionals dedicated to addressing acid reflux and related gastrointestinal issues. Patients at Continental Hospitals benefit from advanced diagnostic tools and personalized treatment plans tailored to manage and alleviate symptoms effectively.

Dr Raghuram Kondala

Consultant Medical Gastroenterologist

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is acid reflux?
Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux (GER), occurs when stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing discomfort and sometimes damage to the lining of the esophagus.
What are the symptoms of acid reflux?
Symptoms may include heartburn, regurgitation (sour or bitter-tasting acid backing up into the throat or mouth), chest pain, difficulty swallowing, chronic cough, and disrupted sleep due to discomfort.
What causes acid reflux?
Acid reflux is often caused by a weakened or dysfunctional lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach. Certain factors like obesity, pregnancy, smoking, and certain foods can exacerbate the condition.
How is acid reflux diagnosed?
Doctors may diagnose acid reflux based on symptoms and medical history. In some cases, they may perform tests such as endoscopy, pH monitoring, or esophageal motility tests to assess the severity and extent of the condition.
What are common treatments for acid reflux?
Treatment options include lifestyle changes (like diet modification, weight loss, and avoiding triggers such as caffeine and spicy foods), medications (such as antacids, H2 receptor blockers, and proton pump inhibitors), and in severe cases, surgery to strengthen the LES.
Can acid reflux lead to complications?
Yes, chronic acid reflux can lead to complications such as esophagitis (inflammation of the esophagus), esophageal strictures (narrowing of the esophagus), Barrett's esophagus (a precancerous condition), and in rare cases, esophageal cancer.
What foods should I avoid if I have acid reflux?
Common trigger foods include spicy or acidic foods, caffeine, chocolate, peppermint, fatty or fried foods, and citrus fruits. However, triggers can vary from person to person, so it's important to identify your own triggers through trial and error.
How can I prevent acid reflux?
Preventive measures include maintaining a healthy weight, eating smaller meals, avoiding lying down immediately after eating, elevating the head of your bed, quitting smoking, and managing stress.
When should I see a doctor about acid reflux?
You should see a doctor if you experience frequent or severe symptoms of acid reflux, especially if lifestyle changes or over-the-counter medications don't provide relief, or if you have difficulty swallowing, unintentional weight loss, or persistent coughing.